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The National Textile Museum Kuala Lumpur and Cultural impact Sdn Bhd are proud to introduce “Sacred Ikat: From Heirloom to Trade”. This exhibition is at the Textiles museum until October 23rd.

Ikat textiles are found in cultures all over the world. Ikat is being woven in Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala and Mexico and also in Uzbekistan in Central Asia. India, Japan and several South-East Asian countries have long histories of Ikat production. Among the most admired ikat come from the island of Sumba and also from Sarawak. The Pua Kumbu – of Sarawak- shares many similarities with the Hinggi of Sumba, yet the legends, symbolism and rituals that surrounding the two vary.

It’s a wonderful opportunity to see beautiful textiles from Sumba and Sarawak.

A series event is organized  in conjunction with the exhibition, starting on Tuesday September 20th,with a Textile Forum with international textiles experts : Judy Knight Achjadi, Edric Ong and Marie-Christine Tseng. The panel of speakers will deliberate on the development of the weaving and lifestyles of the Sumbanese and Ibans. They will also examine the balance between aesthetics and practicality of these ikat textiles. ADMISSION is Free.

For the Forum, please register by replying to this email address: syahrul@jmm.gov.my; or asmah@jmm.gov.my
or call Syahrul or Nor Asmah @ 03-26943457/03-26943461

The National Textile Museum is housed in an elegant and historic building of Indo-Saracenic architecture. It is flanked by the Sultan Abdul Samad building and the DayaBumi complex at 26 Jalan Sultan Hishamuddin, near Merdeka square, Kuala Lumpur. Metro stations “Masjid Jamek” or “Pasar SeniP”. For more information, visit the Website: www.jmm.gov.my

Related posts : the Tun Jugah Foundation, Pua Kumbu Museum in Kuching ; The Society Atelier, organises the World Eco Fiber and TextilesForum (WEFT), Kuching ; Kuching page; Mats of Sarawak by Heidi MunanIban sleeping Mat by Heidi MunanGERAI OA The Indigenous people stall where you can buy Pua Kumbu in KL, Museum Volunteers Malaysia.

Pua Kumbu, Sarawak

Sumba ikat

Farish Noor’s “WHAT YOUR TEACHER DIDN’T TELL YOU: The Annexe Lectures Vol.1”
 Book Launch, on Sat 5 Dec, 8pm, at the Annexe Gallery, Presented by Matahari Books

From the Annexe Gallery website : “Farish A. Noor might just be Malaysia’s hippest intellectual. His gifts are on full display in these expanded versions of public lectures that he delivered at The Annexe Gallery, Central Market Kuala Lumpur in 2008 and 2009.
Find out how “racial difference” became such a big deal in Malaysia, and contrast this against the way our distant ancestors lived. Discover the hidden stories of the keris, Hang Tuah and PAS. There’s also quite a bit of sex. Erudite, impassioned and sometimes just plain naughty, “WHAT YOUR TEACHER DIDN’T TELL YOU” is a stimulating plunge into aspects of our past that have been kept from us.

The 288-page book also contains dozens of sepia-toned photographs, many from Farish’s own collection of antiques. There’s even a bonus chapter! And it’s printed on thick (128 gsm) fully recycled paper. Retail price: RM40 (RM5 off at the launch).”

Please send me your reviews when you have read it. Thanks 🙂

Who they are and what they do

badan-warisan-hqkl

“Giving our past a future” is Badan Warisan Malaysia‘s motto. Badan Warisan Malaysia (the Heritage of Malaysia Trust) is the leading heritage conservation NGO in Malaysia.
It was set up in 1983 by a group people who were concerned about the rapid change taking place in the built environment. Their work involves advocacy, research and development and education.They also undertake physical conservation projects as well as manage two centres.
The Heritage Centre in Kuala Lumpur is a restored colonial bungalow with exhibition, seminar and meeting facilities and a specialist Resource Centre.
Read the rest of this entry »

One of Malaysia’s most incisive historians, Dr Farish Noor continues his OtherMalaysia Public Lecture Series with another thought-provoking installment. The blight of postcolonial national histories is the tendency to accept nation-state boundaries as a given and to write national histories that remain confined within fixed political-territorial limits. So there remains the tendency to see India (and South Asia) as something distinct and alien to Malaysia. A closer look at the history of South and Southeast Asia, however, reveals a longer period of trans-oceanic contact and exchange where Indians, Malays, Sumatrans and Javanese were part of a greater trans-oceanic civilisation where both South and Southeast Asia were connected via the routes of the Indian Ocean. This is a call for an appreciation of our collective past, and to re-think our concepts of national identity today. 

Sat 14 Feb, 4.30pm  at The Annexe Gallery 
Admission Free

Who are they and what they do

mns-activities

The Malaysian Nature Society has been contributing towards the protection of Malaysia’s natural heritage since 1940. A membership-based organisation, it has been the reason behind the protection of many key habitats as well as several national and state parks in Malaysia. Read the rest of this entry »

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